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Events

Spring 2020

All current events cancelled until further notice. Contact FCTL (fctl@ric.edu) for information about future events.

Faculty at FCTL workshop

Bandwidth Recovery: Helping Students Reclaim Cognitive Resources Lost to Poverty, Racism, and Social Marginalization

Dates TBD (Book club)

This book explains how students’ cognitive resources for learning have been diminished by the negative effects of economic insecurity, discrimination, and hostility against nonmajority groups based on race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, or gender identity, and other aspects of difference. The book discusses how learning is impacted, and provides strategies for in and out of the classroom so students can feel a sense of belonging and community that enhance learning. To participate in this book club, email fctl@ric.edu to indicate your interest. Number will be limited to enhance meaningful discussion; the FCTL will cover cost of the books for approximately 5 participants.

Reach Everyone, Teach Everyone: Universal Design for Learning in Higher Education

Dates TBD (Book club)

Advocates for the rights of people with disabilities have worked hard to make universal design in the built environment “just part of what we do.” We no longer see curb cuts, for instance, as accommodations for people with disabilities, but perceive their usefulness every time we ride our bikes or push our strollers through crosswalks. This is also a perfect model for Universal Design for Learning (UDL), a framework grounded in the neuroscience of why, what, and how people learn. Reach Everyone, Teach Everyone is aimed at faculty members, faculty-service staff, disability support providers, student-service staff, campus leaders, and graduate students who want to strengthen the engagement, interaction, and performance of all college students. It includes resources for readers who want to become UDL experts and advocates: real-world case studies, active-learning techniques, UDL coaching skills, micro- and macro-level UDL-adoption guidance, and use-them-now resources. This book club is supported with a grant from RIC’s Dialogue on Diversity Committee Co-Sponsorship Funding program.

How to Enhance STEM by Making It Inclusive

Tues, 2/11 12:00-2:00 p.m. Clarke Science 128.

Prof. Chandralekha Singh (U. of Pittsburgh) will discuss research on how different types of social psychological interventions (e.g., social belonging and growth mindset) have improved the motivation and learning outcomes of all students, especially women and underrepresented minorities in STEM fields. Participants will describe and reflect upon a social belonging and growth mindset intervention that we have incorporated in introductory physics courses. The types of interventions are short, requiring less than one hour of regular class time even though they have the potential to impact student outcomes significantly. (Prof. Chandralekha Singh, U. of Pittsburgh and President-Elect, American Association of Physics Teachers. Sponsored by the RIC Physical Sciences Dept.)

Faculty Development Grant Opportunities

Wed, 2/12 12:30-2:00 p.m. Adams Library 406.
Fri, 2/14 10:00-11:30 a.m. Adams Library 406.

Join a Q&A with the Committee for Faculty Scholarship and Development (CFS&D) and the Center for Research and Creative Activity (CRCA) about their grant opportunities for faculty scholarship, professional development, training, and integration of student research and creative activity into courses. Learn about the application process, what these grants do and do not cover, and how to strengthen your proposal to improve your chances of getting funding. (Kieran Ayton, Chair of the Committee for Faculty Scholarship and Associate Professor Adams Library; Michelle Crossley, CRCA Faculty Fellow and Assistant Professor of Mental Health Counseling)

Advising 101

Wed, 2/19 12:30-2:00 p.m. Adams Library 406.
Fri, 2/21 10:00-11:30 a.m. Adams Library 406.

New to advising at RIC? Looking for a refresher? In this session, we’ll discuss basic approaches to advising RIC students, including the General Education program, FERPA, MyRIC’s Advising Center and Advising Module, and advising resources available to faculty. Bring a laptop if you can. There will be plenty of time for Q & A. (Michelle Brophy-Baermann, Director of Faculty Advising and Associate Professor of Political Science)

Open to Support Accessibility and Inclusion

Thurs, 2/27 2:00-3:00 p.m. Adams Library 406.

There isn’t a singular way to make teaching and learning materials accessible and inclusive, but you can start by having the right to make changes. Open educational resources (OER) allow you to do just that. In this workshop we’ll explore how to use the “5 Rs of open” to break-down barriers to student learning with examples and tips for getting started. (Dragan Gill, Rhode Island Open Textbook Initiative Steering Committee Co-Chair and Assistant Professor Adams Library)

Summer Seminar for Teaching Writing Panel Discussion

Wed, 3/18 12:30-2:00 p.m. Adams Library 406.

Please join the Faculty Center for Teaching and Learning and the Writing Board for the annual Summer Seminar for Teaching Writing (SSTW) Panel Discussion on writing and pedagogy. Faculty from across the disciplines will discuss their experiences learning about and implementing evidence-based practices for teaching writing in the disciplines. (Michael Michaud, Chair of the Writing Board and Professor of English)

Faculty Resources at CRCA

Wed, 3/25 12:30-2:00 p.m. Adams Library 406.

The Center for Research and Creative Activity (CRCA) offers a wide variety of resources to broaden student participation in mentored research and creative activity. Learn about the available resources and how to integrate them into your professional portfolio. (Michelle Crossley, CRCA Faculty Fellow and Assistant Professor of Mental Health Counseling)The Center for Research and Creative Activity (CRCA) offers a wide variety of resources to broaden student participation in mentored research and creative activity. Learn about the available resources and how to integrate them into your professional portfolio. (Michelle Crossley, CRCA Faculty Fellow and Assistant Professor of Mental Health Counseling)

Facilitate Effective Online Discussions

Fri, 3/27 10:00-11:30 a.m. Adams Library 406.

Do you find a lack of active discussions on your online the discussion board? How do you design a discussion board strategy that will engage learners and empower them to learn from each other? This workshop will show you the 4 processes of an engaged online discussion, the strategies and processes you can use to enhance each process, and actionable guide to immediately implement the strategies of your choice. (Jiani Wu, FCTL Instructional Designer)

Understanding Disability Accommodations

Fri, 4/3 12:00-2:00 p.m. Adams Library 406.

Develop a deeper understanding of how the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) applies to postsecondary courses, how to make reasonable accommodations for students’ disabilities, and ensure course content is accessible to all learners. (Keri Rossi-D’entremont, Disability Services)

TILT Your Class for Greater Success and Equity in Learning

Tues, 4/7 12:00-1:30 p.m. Adams Library 406.
Wed, 4/8 12:30-2:00 p.m. Adams Library 406.

The Transparency in Learning and Teaching (TILT) framework helps students better understand learning objectives of course activities and assignments. Research shows that TILT-ing just two assignments in a semester promotes students’ understanding of how they learn, produces significant gains in learning, higher final grades, and helps remove barriers to learning thereby producing greater equity in student learning and academic success. Learn about the TILT framework and how to implement it in your own courses; this technique is appropriate for all disciplines and types of courses. (Roz Sibielski, English/Film Studies & Chris Marco, Psychology)

The How To of Great Writing Assignments — Online Mini-Course

The How To of Great Writing Assignments was created to help faculty members develop more effective and efficient ways to work with students on writing. The course consists of six learning modules, each 15-30 minutes in length, which will help you develop the knowledge and skills to help your students produce writing you’ll want to read. You’ll watch videos on your own time and discuss the content with other faculty members and the instructor, Mike Michaud, Chair of the campus Writing Board. This mini-course will run during the week of 04/13-04/19/2020. Registration is limited to ten faculty members, and spots will be filled on a first-come/first-served basis.

Download full details about The How To of Great Writing Assignments and for registration information.

More Equitable and Efficient Grading

Wed, 4/15 12:30-2:00 p.m. Adams Library 406.
Thurs, 4/16 12:00-1:30 p.m. Adams Library 406.

Imagine a grading system that produces greater engagement, higher-quality work, and less grade anxiety for students. Specifications grading produces all of these positive results, plus it provides a more streamlined and equitable grading process for faculty. Learn about specifications grading from faculty who currently use it – what it is, its benefits, and how to plan your own specifications grading system. Appropriate for all disciplines and types of courses. (Sarah Picard, Art & Roz Sibielski, English/Film Studies)

Visualize Your PowerPoint Using SmartArt

Wed, 4/22 12:30-2:00 p.m. Adams Library 406.

Does your PowerPoint have many bullet points and heavy text? Are you looking for a quick and easy way to spice it up? This workshop will show you how to use a simple point-and-click tool called SmartArt inside PowerPoint to visualize your content. Other techniques will also be presented. After this workshop, you will be a master chef of PowerPoint, and your students will love what they see. (Jiani Wu, FCTL Instructional Designer)

Page last updated: March 20, 2020