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Articles

The Truth About Plagiarism

Patricia B.M. Brennan

Although as faculty we have very specific expectations regarding attribution and documentation when writing as professionals in our academic disciplines, we have different expectations for ourselves when writing in other contexts. What does this reveal about the nature of plagiarism in relation to student writing? This short commentary provides some context and discussion of the differing reasons for documentation in student academic writing as opposed to faculty disciplinary writing and the true nature of student plagiarism.

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The Truth About Plagiarism

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Teaching and Learning Through Student/Faculty Research Collaboration

Roger Clark, Tara Gurka and Lisa Middleton

Two students (Tara and Lisa) and one faculty member (Roger) discuss their apprehensions about, motivations for, frustrations and satisfactions with doing research together. They suggest that, on balance, the teaching and learning opportunities of such collaborations can outweigh the problems.

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Teaching and Learning Through Student/Faculty Research Collaboration

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Is There An Academic In This Text? Or, How Do We Construct Student Writers

Marjorie Roemer

This paper attempts to re-see the role of academic writing in the undergraduate curriculum. Comparing alternative understandings of academic writing as well as the nature of academic performances and the role of the novice in learning about them, it argues for a rhetorical awareness of the role of the individual and the group in discourse communities. By helping students to understand discursive structures (and our own passionate involvements in them), we help them to have many lenses for viewing their worlds. This is both more ambitious and more "basic" than memorizing the formulaic features of the five-paragraph essay, which students often falsely imagine to be the ultimate achievement of academic prose.

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Is There An Academic In This Text? Or, How Do We Construct Student Writers?

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Civil Liberties of Students in Higher Education

Daniel Weisman

Students in higher education face a variety of challenges to their civil liberties, through such mechanisms as censorship, thought and behavior codes, private and arbitrary disciplinary procedures, and release of records to governmental authorities and corporations. This paper reviews students' legal rights in private and public schools, some typical civil rights challenges experienced by students, and recent court cases. Findings include: the freedoms of speech, press and assembly are violated most often (e.g., campus hate speech codes) when students take unpopular or "politically incorrect" positions; when violations are challenged, or made public, the college or university usually backs down or loses in court; the courts have not been as supportive of privacy rights as they have of speech and due process rights; while private schools are not literally subject to constitutional requirements, the courts have held them to similar standards for other reasons; and for the most part, the use of Internet resources does not change student rights, but there are some differences. The paper concludes with some suggestions for students and university administrators.

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Civil Liberties of Students in Higher Education

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Curricular and Pedagogical Issues in General Education

Carolyn Fluehr-Lobban, Ph.D.

Rhode Island College reformed its General Education program and moved ahead of the curve in 1996. With an innovative approach to curriculum General Education 2000 balanced the study of the Western and non-Western worlds in the Core curriculum, and emphasized classroom pedagogy focusing on the skills of intensive writing and critical thinking. Evaluation of the program was launched two years after its introduction and a campus wide dialogue about the changes has been sustained, including substantial student and faculty input. The process, goals of the reforms, as well as the evaluation of the new General Education program are discussed critically in this essay.

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Curricular and Pedagogical Issues in General Education

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Noise from the Rhode Island College Writing Center: Narrative of a Research Project

Meg Carroll

As a result of Elizabeth Boquet's observation of the Rhode Island College tutor preparation program as part of the research for her book, Noise from the Writing Center, the tutors and director became participant researchers themselves and gained new insights into the evolving nature of their program, one that is based on collaboration, on exposure to a variety of theoretical positions, and one that downplays the simple learning of tutoring strategies by emphasizing a variety of learning styles, play, and risk taking.

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Noise from the Rhode Island College Writing Center: Narrative of a Research Project

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Teaching Urban Planning and Public Policy: Developing a "City as Classroom" Model at Two New England Colleges

Steven Corey and Mark Motte

Emerging trends in teaching urban geography, city planning, and public policy studies resonate with calls from think tanks, research associations, and most recently the Carnegie Foundation, for undergraduate education to be "reinvented" as interdisciplinary, inquiry-based, and experiential. This paper outlines a model that offers some success with inquiry-based learning strategies in the geography program at Rhode Island College and the urban studies program at Worcester State College. In grappling with the knotty problems of contemporary urban development/redevelopment policies in Providence and Worcester (downtown revitalization, infrastructure improvements, retail/commercial strategies, industrial restructuring, shifting labor markets, neighborhood planning, housing development, etc.), our students have demonstrated that work in the field--when closely supervised by professors and reinforced with well-targeted reading and case studies--is a productive and rewarding way for undergraduates to understand the dynamics of urban change.

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Teaching Urban Planning and Public Policy: Developing a "City as Classroom" Model at Two New England Colleges

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Student Responses to the Use of WebCT in a Financial Accounting Course

Lisa Church

This paper discusses the effectiveness of using WebCT in a financial accounting course. Discussion includes results of an anonymous student survey indicating to what extent WebCT contributed to student learning in the course as well as students' overall impressions of WebCT.

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Student Responses to the Use of WebCT in a Financial Accounting Course

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Development of the Student Success Scale to Predict Non-Intellectual Factors Related to Student Retention and Achievement

Joan H. Rollins, Mary Zahm, Peter F. Merenda, and Gary Burkholder

This article reports on the preliminary development of a Student Success Scale to measure non-intellectual factors related to college achievement as measured by grade point average (GPA). A 200 item scale was completed by 340 students at Rhode Island College during fall semester 1998. Grade point averages were obtained 275 students from the Records Office in February of 2000. Exploratory factor analysis indicated there were seven factors. Three of the factors, Hard Work/Time Management, Responsibility and Self-Confidence were significantly correlated with students' grade point averages. Some items that did not load on any factor were also correlated with GPA.

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Development of the Student Success Scale to Predict Non-Intellectual Factors Related to Student Retention and Achievement

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Assistive technology in education: A review of policies, standards, and curriculum integration from 1997 through 2000 involving assistive technology and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act

Elizabeth M. Dalton, M.Ed.

Assistive technology was practically unknown in 1975, the year of landmark legislation establishing equal educational rights for students with disabilities. Personal technology tools for education were in their infancy. In 1997, federal IDEA amendments required assistive technology consideration in every student's individualized educational program. How did this happen? What impact does assistive technology policy and standards have on students, teachers, and the field of education? What areas for further development remain? This article presents a recent historical view of assistive technology through the lenses of special education law and technology standards. Assistive technology is discussed in relation to equity of access to curriculum for all students.

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Assistive Technology In Education

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Page last updated: September 27, 2011