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Paul Lisowski to present the 2011 Gehrenbeck Lecture, Nov. 10

Dr. Paul Lisowski, a former assistant secretary in the U.S. Department of Energy, will provide the 16th Annual Richard K. Gehrenbeck Memorial Lecture on Thursday, Nov. 10, at 8 p.m. in the Clarke Science Building (room 125).


Paul Lisowski
Lisowski will present “Nuclear Power – Quo Vadis,” which will place nuclear power in the overall energy landscape; examine nuclear fuel cycle technology now in place with a view of what is possible for the future; and discuss the impact of the recent nuclear disaster in Fukushima, Japan.

Lisowski served as director of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center from 2001 through 2006, with responsibility for the national user facility research program and facility operations. During 29 years at Los Alamos National Laboratory, he held a range of technical, line and program management positions, including leadership of the Neutron and Nuclear Science Group, and national project director for the Accelerator Production of Tritium Project.

Following his retirement in 2006 from Los Alamos National Laboratory, Lisowski joined the Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy, as deputy assistant secretary for fuel cycle management.

He currently owns Advanced Nuclear Sciences, LLC, which provides consulting services on nuclear energy related matters for the Department of Energy, and also works with TechSource as a management consultant and nuclear science research and development analyst.

Richard Gehrenbeck taught physics and astronomy at RIC for 22 years until his death in 1993. His doctoral degree from the University of Minnesota was in the history of science, and his course “The Rise of Modern Science” was an innovative lab-based introduction to that field. The Gehrenbeck lecture, presented each year in his memory, brings an active scholar to the college each year to present a public lecture on a topic related to the history of science.

For more information, contact Professor John Williams at (401) 456-8049 or jcwilliams@ric.edu.