Courses at the 300-level

PHIL 300: American Philosophy

In this survey from the American colonial period to the present, some of the major works of significant American philosophers are read and discussed. Among the philosophers considered are Charles Peirce, William James, and John Dewey.
4 credit hours

Prerequisites:
  • completion of at least 30 college credits or any 100- or 200-level philosophy course
PHIL 305: Intermediate Logic

This course covers some extensions of elementary logic with applications. Topics may include propositional modal logic, quantified modal logic, inductive logic, and meta-logic.
4 credit hours

Prerequisites:
  • completion of at least 30 college credits or any 100- or 200-level philosophy course
PHIL 306: Contemporary Ethical Theory

Theories about the nature and possibility of ethics are discussed. Topics may include relativism, egoism, intuitionism, moral realism, the nature of the moral person, moral development, feminist ethics, and the significance of evolution.
3 credit hours

Prerequisites:
  • completion of at least 30 college credits or any 100- or 200-level philosophy course
PHIL 311: Knowledge and Truth

The concept of knowledge and its relationship to the world of experience is investigated. Various theories of the nature of truth are presented and analyzed. Students are introduced to epistemology.
3 credit hours

Prerequisites:
  • completion of at least 30 college credits or any 100- or 200-level philosophy course
PHIL 315: Evidence, Reasoning, and Proof

The concept of evidence, types of reasoning, and standards of proof are examined. Topics include types of evidence, evaluating evidence, eyewitness claims, expert testimony and memory, appraising reasoning, and standards of proof.
3 credit hours

Prerequisites:
  • completion of at least 30 college credits or any 100- or 200-level philosophy course
PHIL 320: Philosophy of Science

Induction and probability, causality and the laws of nature, as well as the nature of explanation and justification are covered.
4 credit hours

Prerequisites:
  • completion of at least 30 college credits or any 100- or 200-level philosophy course
PHIL 321: Social and Political Philosophy

Students examine social and political theories and the philosophical issues they raise concerning the origin of society and man's nature as a "political being" and "social being."
3 credit hours

Prerequisites:
  • completion of 30 college credits or any 100- or 200-level philosophy course
PHIL 322: Philosophy of Law

Conceptual problems regarding law and legal systems are examined. Topics may include the nature of law, law and morality, civil disobedience, positivism, naturalism, personhood under the law, rights, punishment, and criminal responsibility.
3 credit hours

Prerequisites:
  • completion of completion of 30 college credits or any 100- or 200-level philosophy course
PHIL 325: Environmental Ethics

Theories and reality, ideology and action, and values and facts are examined. Focus is on rational policy decision making.
3 credit hours

Prerequisites:
  • completion of 30 college credits or any 100- or 200-level philosophy course
PHIL 330: Metaphysics

This is a problem-oriented introduction to some of the central issues of contemporary metaphysics. Topics may include ontology (what exists), necessity, causation, free will/determinism, space and time, and identity-over-time.
3 credit hours

Prerequisites:
  • completion of at least 30 college credits or any 100- or 200-level philosophy course
PHIL 333: Philosophy of Mind

The status and role of mind in relation to body is studied. Diverse theories, such as mind/body dualism, identity theory, behaviorism, functionalism, and emergence, are discussed.
3 credit hours

Prerequisites:
  • completion of at least 30 college credits or any 100- or 200-level philosophy course
PHIL 351: Plato, Aristotle, and Greek Philosophy

The origins of philosophy in Greek thought are explored. Works of philosophers such as Plato and Aristotle are read. (Formerly Plato, Aristotle, and Greek Thought.)
4 credit hours

Prerequisites:
  • completion of at least 30 college credits or any 100- or 200-level philosophy course
PHIL 353: Epicureans, Stoics, Skeptics, and Hellenistic Philosophy

Greek and Roman philosophy after Aristotle and before the Medieval period is studied. (Formerly Epicurus, Plotinus, and Hellenistic Philosophy.)
4 credit hours

Prerequisites:
  • Prerequisite: completion of at least 30 college credits or any 100- or 200-level philosophy course
PHIL 355: Augustine, Aquinas, and Medieval Philosophy

The origins of medieval thought are traced. The institutionalization of philosophic thought is analyzed. The works of Aquinas and Augustine are studied. (Formerly Aquinas, Bonaventure, and Medieval Thought.)
4 credit hours

Prerequisites:
  • completion of at least 30 college credits or any 100- or 200-level philosophy course
PHIL 356: Descartes, Hume, Kant, and Modern Philosophy

Works from European philosophers from Descartes to Kant are read. (Formerly Seventeenth- and Eighteenth-Century Philosophers.)
4 credit hours

Prerequisites:
  • completion of at least 30 college credits or any 100- or 200-level philosophy course
PHIL 357: Hegel, Nietzsche, and Nineteenth-Century Philosophy

Selections from the works of Hegel and Nietzsche are analyzed and critiqued along with other nineteenth-century philosophers, such as Kierkegaard, Schopenhauer, Marx, and Freud.
4 credit hours

Prerequisites:
  • completion of at least 30 college credits or any 100- or 200-level philosophy course
PHIL 358: Existentialism and Phenomenological Philosophy

The main themes of existentialist philosophy and its successors are investigated through the study of such authors as Kierkegaard, Heidegger, Sartre, and Camus. (Formerly Existentialism and Contemporary Philosophy.)
4 credit hours

Prerequisites:
  • completion of at least 30 college credits or any 100- or 200-level philosophy course
PHIL 359: Frege, Russell, Wittgenstein, and Analytic Philosophy

Late nineteenth- and twentieth-century philosophers of language, such as Frege, Russell, Moore, Wittgenstein, Austin, Quine, and Kripke, are studied. (Formerly Contemporary Analytic Philosophy.)
4 credit hours

Prerequisites:
  • completion of at least 30 college credits or any 100- or 200-level philosophy course
PHIL 363-364: Seminar in Philosophy

Concepts, individual thinkers, or institutional movements may be chosen and explored intensively.
3 or 4 credit hours

Prerequisites:
  • Consent of instructor and department chair
PHIL 391-394: Independent Study

Students select a topic and undertake concentrated research under the supervision of a faculty advisor.
1-4 credit hours

Prerequisites:
  • Consent of instructor and department chair

Page last updated: March 20, 2006