Goal 1

Ensure high quality learning opportunities for all students

Objectives in red are those to be met in academic year 2007-2008.

Objective 1.1

Develop and implement outcome assessment plans for all undergraduate programs, including General Education (2007-08); develop and implement outcome assessment plans for all graduate programs (2008-09).

Primary Responsibility: Vice President for Academic Affairs

Progress to Date:

Assessment of Student Learning Activities

Assessment of General Education

Update
Adopted and implemented the Collegiate Learning Assessment (CLA) cross sectional approach to measure General Education skills of critical thinking, analytic reasoning and written communication. In the fall 2007 semester 100 entering freshman participated in this opportunity to measure the value added by our general education program.

Projection
One hundred graduating seniors will participate in this assessment in spring 2008.
We anticipate the results over time will allow us to analyze the growth of the skills as students progress through the institution and compare our outcomes to those of other institutions.

Management of Assessment Data

Update

Adopted and are about to implement TrueOutcomes, a complete electronic assessment data management system.  This system was purchased and is being operationalized to organize, document, analyze and report our assessment activities. Although, we anticipated entering our first programs into this system in October, the server was not user ready. Start-up date: November 26, 2007.

Projection

We will move programs into the system on a program by program basis, beginning with the Feinstein School of Education and Human Development. Faculty in the School of Management will be working with Cengage, the owner of TrueOutcomes to pilot assessment for schools of business. Once these programs have tested and validated the server, additional programs will participate.

Publication of Program Goals

Update
The College began to publish program goals in the electronic version (CD) of the College Catalog in the fall 2007 semester.

Projection
The next version of the paper catalog 2009-2011 will include the program goals.

Assessment of Student Learning Outcomes

Update
All undergraduate programs have developed plans for the assessment of student learning outcomes. To date, several programs have implemented or are planning the implementation of changes to improve teaching effectiveness and raise the achievement level on assessment measures.

Examples:

FAS
English Major
Revised Elementary Education curriculum for content majors in response to assessment results.,     The new curriculum, which goes into effect in the fall of 2007, includes more survey courses that are also writing intensive (205, 206, 207) and eliminates the capstone course. The new curriculum will better prepare students to teach at the elementary level.

The English Department is piloting a new mandatory advising system intended to promote student success. Along with the School of Social Work students, all English majors are required to see an advisor prior to registering for the spring 2008 semester.

History Major
Analysis of the evidence derived from portfolios and scores on the Praxis II exams signifies that the existing curriculum generally satisfies the department’s expected outcomes. In order to promote continuous improvement, faculty in the department have embarked on several initiatives to improve teaching and learning. They were awarded a grant to purchase hardware to enhance the faculty’s ability to present online and classroom content. The faculty participated in technology workshops to utilize WebCt in the delivery of general education courses, in addition to learning the potential use of e-packs in history courses.

SOM
Computer Information Systems
Revised content and instruction in CIS 421 Networks and Telecommunications in response to data indicating students achieved a slightly lower than expected aggregated score on program learning outcome addressing the understanding of networking in a business environment.

Economics
As part of the assessment strategies in the department, faculty developed and implemented scoring rubrics for research papers and oral presentations that are considered to be evidence of achieving program outcomes.  The faculty has begun sharing the rubrics in class with students in advance of the assignments, using them to share expectations for successful performance. Since they began using the rubrics as a teaching strategy for the research papers, the scores have improved. They plan to continue this strategy and implement for oral presentations.
 
SSW

Faculty in the BSW program rely on two instruments to evaluate the clinical practice of senior students. In response to multiple years of data, using a field evaluation instrument which field supervisors implement to evaluate students in the senior year and a self assessment, several curricular changes have been made. In 2006, faculty expanded the research content by one credit and attribute some of the improvement in the 2007 scores to this change. They are also strengthening large-system and self-awareness components along with tying social justice experiences more closely to course work.

SON

The School of Nursing has a comprehensive Performance Improvement Plan to frame school wide assessment. Using the outcome of graduate performance on the NCLEX-RN licensing examination, faculty have raised the score on content mastery tests throughout the curriculum from the 40th to the 50th percentile to reflect a more appropriate standard of achievement, along with adopting the HESI Exit Exam as a requirement in the last required course. These changes have been associated with a remarkable and sustained increase in the NCLEX-RN pass rate.

Programs that have achieved successful completion of a cycle of student outcomes assessment:

Feinstein School of Education and Human Development 
BA, MA, M. Ed, CAGS, PhD

School of Management

BS Accounting
BS Finance
BS Computer Information Systems
BS Management
BS Marketing
BS Economics

Faculty of Arts and Sciences
BA Biology
BA Mathematics, Secondary Education Mathematics
BA BS Computer Science
BA Psychology
B S Chemical Dependency and Addiction Studies

School of Nursing
BSN

School of Social Work
BSW

Programs whose outcomes assessment is accepted, pending completion of a full cycle in 2008-2009

None yet

1/24/08

Academic Affairs Update:

The development and implementation of outcomes assessment continues.  In the Arts and Sciences, at the March 7, 2008 Meeting  the programs offering BS/BA in Chemistry, BA in  Dance Performance, BA in English, BA  in History, BA in Philosophy and the BA in Physics, along with the BA in Sociology were approved. On May 2, 2008, the BA in Music, BS in Music Education, BM in Performance, BA in Political Science and the BA in Theatre were approved in Category 1. In June, 8 additional programs in Arts and Sciences will be reviewed. In August the results of the Collegiate Learning Assessment, (CLA) will be presented as evidence of beginning assessment of learning in General Education along

Calendar of graduate programs outcomes assessment presentations is underdevelopment and will be reviewed by assessment coordinators on June 13, 2008.

Administration and Finance Update:

Institutional Research staff served on the Committee on the Assessment of Student Outcomes.

Management Information Services, User Support Services, and Institutional Research assisted with testing and training for True Outcomes, the College’s assessment system.  A test instance of the application was hosted at URI and several Feinstein School of Education faculty members received accounts.  MIS, IR, and USS staff participated in the True Outcomes faculty training session.  USS assisted with the search for an assessment specialist who will support the implementation of True Outcomes next year.

6/2/08

Back to objectives

Objective 1.2

Coordinate academic program review to ensure that program quality and productivity, communications about program changes, and program oversight are accomplished. As resources become available, purchase online assessment tools, such as True Outcomes.

Primary Responsibility: Vice President for Academic Affairs

Progress to Date:

RIC's mission statement was approved by the RIBGHE on April 10, 2006. The Council of Rhode Island College approved a plan for the periodic review of the mission statement on September 14, 2007. Furthermore, in the fall of 2007, all school mission statements were reviewed to ensure alignment with the broader college mission and all external publications were checked to ensure that the mission statement appears.

1/24/08

Academic Affairs Update:

Complete targeted reviews of all programs targeted by board for 2007-2008

On March 7, 2008 nine targeted programs were reviewed. The Board voted to eliminate the BA in Labor Studies and to consider consolidation of the MAT in Music Education and MMEd.  The BA in French, BA in Physics, MA in Biology, BA in History and BS in Computer Science were retained and will be monitored through regular cyclical review. It also voted to retain the MFA in Theatre/Drama and BS in Clinical Laboratory Science for two years while strategies to increase enrollments and graduation rates are put in place.

Periodic Review of mission statement as a means of ensuring high quality programs.

RIC’s mission statement was approved by the RIBGHE on April 10, 2006.  Asst. VPAA Mark Motte checked with Director of PR Jane Fusco to ensure that all relevant publications contain the April 2006 approved  version of the mission statement (this milestone was met on December 2007).  On September 14, 2007, the Council of Rhode Island College approved a simple plan for periodic review of the mission statement, with the next review due in September 2009 in preparation for the beginning of the new strategic plan.  On September 5, 2007, the mission statements of the academic schools were reviewed by the VPAA and deans to ensure that they aligned with the institutional mission. Suggestions also were made for revision of the mission statement s to ensure they were brief and memorable as well as in keeping with the institutional mission. Once the NEASC response to the Jan. 2008 NEASC report is received by the President, the Academic Leadership Roundtable (the ALR consists of the VPAA,  deans, library director, and assistant and assistant to the VPAA)  will review the letter and make any necessary changes in plans and projects (milestone due  in May 2008).  The completion of draft school plans is not due until September 2008; however, the School of Nursing has had its draft plan reviewed by the VPAA (May 8, 2008), the School of Social Work has a plan that is well along, Arts and Sciences and Education are working on plans, and SOM had a plan in September 2007 that now needs to be simply fine tuned prior to September.

Administration and Finance Update:

The TrueOutcomes student outcomes assessment software was jointly purchased by RIC/URI and CCRI.

Institutional Research provided student statistics ( e.g. enrollment and graduation numbers) and faculty workload data for academic program reviews.

Publishing Services worked with the Academic Affairs to produce an electronic College Catalog. Five thousand disks were created for wide distribution to prospective students and others.

Publishing Services worked with the Feinstein School of Education and Human Development, the School of Social Work and the Assistant Vice President for Academic Affairs to promote early Spring courses in the Course Bulletin.

6/2/08

Back to objectives

Objective 1.3

By Spring 2008, Deans will submit plans to the Vice President for Academic Affairs to highlight and to publicize current on- and off-campus departmental internships, service learning, and other experiential learning opportunities, and to enhance and to expand such opportunities.

Primary Responsibility: Vice President for Academic Affairs

Progress to Date:

The deans, in conjunction with the VPAA, are developing a format for departmental reporting of current on- and off-campus departmental internships, service learning, and other experiential learning opportunities. The data collection process as begun and will be refined through spring 2008. The RIC Web site showcases many of these opportunities as well as the ORGA (Office of Research and Grants) Newsletters.

1/24/08

Academic Affairs Update:

Deans will submit plans to the VPAA to highlight and to publicize current on- and off-campus departmental internships, service learning, and other experiential learning opportunities and to enhance and expand opportunities (due spring 2008). 

Gerri, McPhee, the VISTA volunteer who is working with Professor Valerie Endress, has gathered information from all schools except the School of Social Work and is compiling the information in a chart.  She is also identifying exemplary internship opportunities that can be used by others on campus to develop a well-rounded set of experiential learning opportunities in all schools.  Ms. McPhee and Drl Endress expect the work to be completed by July 2008. 

Two Websites will be used to disseminate information on experiential learning.

1.  RIC’s Website already showcases opportunities for students who wish to become involved in research at RIC.  These offering appear at http://www.ric.edu/orga/undergrad_students.php

2.  Linda Davis, director of Career Development, has also developed a Website that she demonstrated to the deans at an ALR meeting in April.  She offered to provide information on her web site regarding the available internships with a link to the academic departments.  The information available in July will be discussed with Linda Davis for possible addition to her Website.

Administration and Finance Update:

The first Budget Office Intern graduated!  This was a pilot of a non-credit internship targeted towards a student with an accounting or finance major.  He has secured gainful employment certainly enhanced by two years of relevant work at the College.  The second Budget Office Intern is in place.

Obtained approval to hire the first Purchasing Internship, which is also non-credit targeted towards a business major who will assist the Purchasing Staff with Online Requisitioning, setups for training, project tracking, and bid opening process especially for Facilities & Operations projects. 

Although unofficial, many students work in departments in Administration & Finance in areas that either relates to their program of study or their ultimate job placement.

6/2/08

Back to objectives

Objective 1.4

By Fall 2008, design a comprehensive developmental education plan in support of a demonstration project to enhance the preparation and success of prospective and newly enrolled students who have deficient academic preparation.

Primary Responsibility: Vice President for Academic Affairs

Progress to Date:

The RIOHE/RIC/Mount Pleasant High School pilot project, "Pathways Through College," has been implemented during the fall 2007 semester with 25 students. During the fall, students took College Course 125, which strengthens basic skills appropriate for the beginning college student. All 25 students performed well enough in the fall class to proceed to take four college courses (12 credits) on the RIC campus commencing with the spring 2008 semester. The developmental education plan that supports Pathways Through College has the following components: daily, scheduled skill-building sessions with instructors qualified to provide support in reading, writing and mathematics; access to appropriate developmental software at the College's main computer laboratory; access to the Mathematics Learning Center at the Office of Academic Support and Information Services (OASIS); and assignment to the project of a reading/writing specialist from OASIS. Every student has taken Accuplacer, a computer-based placement program, to ensure that appropriate, student-specific developmental supports are put in place.

1/24/08

Academic Affairs Update:

Pathways Through College is a dual enrollment pilot program that was implemented by the RI Office of Higher Education, Mount Pleasant High School and Rhode Island College during the fall of 2007 and spring of 2008.  An evaluation is in process (spring through summer 2008) of the project’s impacts on student persistence and engagement, academic attainment, the ease of the school-to-college transition and, as the cohort moves through college, student retention rates.  A report, including an assessment of preliminary data, is forthcoming from the evaluation consultant.

User Support Services has worked closely with members of OASIS, and the Mathematics Learning Center in particular, to ensure that hardware and software for the teaching and learning of developmental students are met.  Recommendations for additional software will emerge from continuing discussions between the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science faculty and the OASIS-based Mathematics Learning Center staff.  A report by Barbara Bonham, a nationally recognized developmental education consultant, has spurred discussions of content and assessment in the College’s core developmental math course (MATH 010), the structure of the College’s math competency exam, and the appropriateness of using Accuplacer to gauge more effectively the needs and placement of newly enrolled freshmen.

User Support Services continues to partner with the Office of Student Life … In support of assistive technology, User Support Services, the Office of Student Life, OASIS, and Adams Library worked together and brought to completion an upgrade to the Assistive Technology Lab in Adams Library in April 2008.

Administration and Finance Update:

User Support Services worked with direct service providers and other partners to identify appropriate hardware and software for developmental education. Spring 2008 the Maple Survival Kit in College was installed in computer labs support the Pathways Through College Program-Mt. Pleasant. 

College Computing Labs and Electronic classrooms are utilized by the PEP program and the Pathways Through College Program. 

User Support Services continues to partner with the Office of Student Life, OASIS and Adams Library to support Assistive Technology.  A workstation and laptop refresh was completed in September of 2007 and two additional workstations, a printer and two scanners were added to the Assistive Technology Lab in Adams Library during Spring 2008.

6/2/08

Back to objectives

Objective 1.5

During the 2007-08 academic year, develop a comprehensive plan for educational technology including, as resources permit, electronic classrooms, labs and other academic venues.

Primary Responsibility: Vice President for Academic Affairs, Vice President for Administration & Finance

Progress to Date:

The Departmental Technology Liaisons (each department has a technology liaison, or DTL), and the RIC Council Academic Technology Advisory Committee (ATAC) has been vital in producing a campus-wide plan because they have provided the necessary input from faculty.  Facilities’ technology enhancements are also informed by both departmental requests, the pattern of demand for e-facilities through the scheduling office, and for technology equipment (primarily from AV) in the classrooms.  Some issues have been a topic for discussion at the PEC meetings; e.g., the USS/AV merger.
 
The general planning process related to educational technology is as follows:

  1. User Support Services solicits and receives suggestions from Departmental Technology Liaisons and Department Chairs to equip existing classroom for electronic presentations.
  2. In response, rooms heavily used by the department are evaluated by USS/AV to determine rooms that would are best suited for an e-classroom retrofit.  We assess location, acoustics, physical condition, and existing usage patterns (including a historical review of the number of AV setups) before making a final choice.
  3. User Support Services contacts Records/Scheduling and Facilities and Operations to see if there are known problems with the classrooms under review.
  4. User Support Services contacts the Department Chair and DTL to recommend a room for renovation.


 Planned and in process for 2007-2008 are the following:

  • Five classrooms in Henry Barnard School (HBS 205, 212, 214, 215 and 202), will be renovated and equipped with e-classroom and lab technology under the auspices of STEM and a Champlin grant.  Completion scheduled for August 2008.
  • USS and AV have renovated six e-classrooms, Gaige 309E, Gaige 315E, Craig Lee 104, Craig Lee 231, Craig Lee 253, and Horace Mann 190.   Five of these classrooms were selected as e-classroom venues by the Departmental Technology Liaisons.  The sixth, Gaige 315, was added to provide adequate security for Gaige 309.
  • USS also completed the first phase of renovation in Gaige 164 by placing e-classroom equipment in the room.  Opening Gaige 164 as a videoconferencing and lecture capture facility by the end of the fiscal year remains an important goal.
  • Equipment and funding have been obtained to retrofit e-classroom equipment into the Art History Lecture Hall in Clarke Science.  To be completed over the semester break.
  • USS expects to outfit Horace Mann 192 as an e-classroom this spring.
  • In the Horace Mann walk-in lab 85 PCs were replaced with new Dell Optiplex computers, and 4 new Apple Multimedia workstations were added. The Apple Lab for Multimedia, Whipple 104, was equipped with new Intel Mac Pros.
  • New Dells were also purchased for Alger 101, Alger, 102, Gaige 163 and Gaige 168.
  • Every centrally-administered e-classroom on campus received new PCs and Macs.
  • Thirty student laptops were ordered for Adams Library.  In addition, the five circulating laptops for faculty were replaced with newly purchased Latitudes.  The recovered laptops (3 to 5 years old) will be issued to academic department at the Library’s convenience.
  • After approval by the Dean and the Child Welfare Institute, plans are underway to purchase new computers for the School of Social Work and install them in their student lab before the beginning of Spring Semester.
  • The Dean of Arts and Sciences is working with the departments of Art and Communication to refresh their departmental Mac labs (photo and graphic communications) with new Intel-based Apple iMacs during the spring ’08 semester.
  • Two “learning spaces” for student group work will be created in the space freed up by the move of the helpdesk from Horace Mann Technology Center to Gaige Hall.

For 2008-2009:
 Through the STEM initiative Gaige 253W and 257W and Fogarty Life Science 108 and 209 are to be renovated and converted to enhanced e-classrooms.  Begin FLS 105 and Clarke Science 128 e-facilities renovations.

  • Gaige Auditorium lighting improvements and e-facilities enhancements.
  • Craig-Lee 153,  Craig-Lee 224 (Political Science), and Gaige 254 (Anthropology)
  • Possible CL 051 or 053 e-classroom conversions.
  • Lab workstation and e-classroom replacement cycle (TBD).


For 2009-2010

  • Through STEM, finish FLS 105 and Clarke Science 128 e-facilities renovations.  Renovate and re-outfit as enhanced e-classrooms Horace Mann 185, 186, 189, 190.
  • Possible e-classroom conversions of Gaige 301E, 258W and 255W.
  • Lab workstation and e-classroom replacement cycle (TBD).

1/24/08

Academic Affairs Update:

Thirty student laptops were ordered for Adams Library … In spring 2007 User Support Services (USS) ordered thirty new Dell Latitude computers as replacements for those on Reserves for use in the Library.  In addition, five new Latitudes were ordered by USS to replace the five on Reserves designated for faculty use. All thirty five computers were received by USS in summer 2007, and the replacement process took place over winter intersession 2008.  USS recovered the replaced laptops and began issuing some of these to academic departments during the spring 2008 semester.  In February 2008 the computers and projectors designated for faculty use held by the Library were transferred to the Gaige Help Center, which thenceforth assumed responsibility for lending this equipment to faculty and staff.

Administration and Finance Update:

Faculty input from the Departmental Technology Liaisons (each department has a technology liaison, or DTL) and the RIC Council Academic Technology Advisory Committee (ATAC) has been vital in planning for facilities’ technology enhancements.  

From departmental requests, the pattern of demand for e-facilities through the scheduling office and for technology equipment in the classrooms, rooms were identified that are best suited for e-classroom retrofitting. Equipment purchases were made. Electronic instructional venues were designed. 

The Gaige Help Center was created with the merger of the User Support Services and Audio Visual departments.

Five classrooms in Henry Barnard School (HBS 205, 212, 214, 215 and 202), will be renovated and equipped with e-classroom and lab technology under the auspices of STEM Program and a Champlin grant.  Completion scheduled for Fall 2008.

USS and AV have renovated seven e-classrooms, Gaige 256, Gaige 309E, Gaige 315E, Craig Lee 104, Craig Lee 231, Craig Lee 253, and Horace Mann 190.   Six of these classrooms were selected as e-classrooms by the Departmental Technology Liaisons.  The seventh, Gaige 315, was added to provide adequate security for Gaige 309.  USS renovated Craig Lee 224 during the Fall semester.  Gaige 254 was retrofitted with a computer and multimedia technology during the spring break.  Summer 2008 USS plans to equip Craig Lee 151, 153 and 228, Whipple 218 and Gaige Auditorium with electronic classroom technology. 

USS completed the first phase of renovation in Gaige 164 by installing e-classroom equipment.  Opening Gaige 164 as a videoconferencing and lecture capture facility should be completed before the classes begin in the fall of 2008.

E-classroom equipment was installed in the Art History Lecture Hall in Clarke Science. 

USS outfitted Horace Mann 192 as an e-classroom during intersession.

The percentage of classrooms with projectors and multimedia equipment will be 40% by the end of summer 2008.

In the walk-in labs, 80 PCs were replaced with new Dell Optiplex computers, and 4 new Apple Multimedia workstations were added. 

The Apple Lab for Multimedia, Whipple 104, was equipped with new Intel Mac Pros.  

New Dells were also purchased for Alger 101, Alger, 102, Gaige 163 and Gaige 168.

Every centrally-administered e-classroom on campus received new PCs and Macs. 

Thirty student laptops were delivered to the Library this year.  USS installed Deep Freeze reboot to restore software on the new student laptops.

USS services five faculty laptops which are available for faculty loan from the Gaige Help Center.  Twelve of the recovered laptops were repaired and issued to academic departments. 

Working with the Dean and the Child Welfare Institute, USS installed computers for the School of Social Work over semester break.

The Dean of Arts and Sciences is working with the departments of Art and Communications to refresh their departmental Mac labs (photo and graphic communications) with new Intel-based Apple iMacs during the spring ’08 semester.  Installations are planned for twenty (20) new 24” iMac computers for the Photo Lab (Whipple 107) and 7 new 20” iMac computers for the Graphic Design lab (Whipple 103) June 2008.

Three “learning spaces” for student group work are being created in the space freed up by the move of the helpdesk from Horace Mann Technology Center to Gaige Hall. Tentative completion date is August 2008.

6/2/08

Back to objectives

Objective 1.6

As resources permit, strengthen the library collection; expand access to electronic knowledge resources; create student social spaces in the library where students can meet, do group work, and use their laptops. As resources permit, establish a Learning Commons in the library that accommodates individual research and collaborative learning.

Primary Responsibility: Vice President for Academic Affairs, Vice President for Administration & Finance

Progress To Date:

From July 2005 to date, the Library has provided access to 822 additional electronic knowledge resources for its users in an effort to increase accessibility to the Library’s resources and services.

In the last two fiscal years (FY06 and FY07) 13,401 print volumes were added to the Library’s collections in an effort to “strengthen the library collection.” (Quote comes from Plan 2010, Objective 1.6 and is also related to Goal 3, “Increase depth, currency, curricular relevance and physical condition of the Library’s collections.” of the Library’s Strategic Plan)

In regard to creating social spaces, students can meet in the Reinhardt Reading Room for group work and use of laptops.

A report, authored by Mark Handler, was submitted to VP King in spring 2006 that preceded the thinking that has since gone into the imminent establishment of an electronic classroom for the library and plans for the Fortes Room to become a repository for the Shinn doll collection. The library is re-exploring the concept of a learning commons.

Facilities and Operations Staff are overseeing Adams Library renovations including the relocation of a computer lab to the main level to expand the number of computers in a more multipurpose environment as well as provide more access to and supervision of computing equipment. This renovation includes the reduction and relocation of the microfiche facilities, shifts in power needs, as well as updates to the carpet and paint in affected areas. This project should be complete for spring 2008.

1/24/08

Academic Affairs Update:

Add a significant number of appropriate information and knowledge resources to the tangible collections through purchase, donation, and subscription. (Yearly)

Increase the number of electronic knowledge resources to which the Library provides access for its users. (Yearly)

Develop a new plan for creating a Learning Commons in the Library in support of individual research and collaborative learning and integrated academic support services.  (Fall 2008)

Administration and Finance Update:

User Support Services and Network & Telecommunications continue to work collaboratively with Adams Library to support a learning management system that incorporates electronic resources and respects intellectual property.

Assistive Technology Lab in Adams Library was refreshed.

Discussions of a Learning Commons have been postponed due to funding constraints.

6/2/08

Back to objectives

Objective 1.7

By July 2010, implement the Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) initiative.

Primary Responsibility: Vice President for Academic Affairs, Vice President for Administration & Finance

Progress To Date:

STEM preliminary architectural plans are complete anticipation of construction during summer 2008. The STEM project is being supplemented using asset protection funds to enhance bathrooms, sprinkler systems, fire alarms, and air conditioning in the adjacent areas. The STEM Center and two electronic classrooms in the Henry Barnard School are expected to be completed before fall 2008. Future enhancements could bring 15 additional technology-enhanced facilities on-line over the next four years.

1/24/08

Administration and Finance Update:

Champlin Grants provided initial funding for equipment and renovations that will be used in classrooms dedicated to mathematics and science for elementary education.

Accounting and Purchasing Departments worked with Facilities & Operations to facilitate payment for STEM funded projects with State issued certificates of participation (COPs).

Supplemental funding for STEM and STEM-related projects include the College’s Asset Protection budget to enhance bathrooms, sprinkler systems, fire alarms, and air conditioning in adjacent areas beginning Summer 2008. 

Facilities & Operations and Information Services collaborated with faculty, architects, and technology consultants, to design new e-facilities (classrooms and lecture halls) and select software and equipment for STEM initiative.

Tablet PCs and software were purchased for faculty training were purchased with Champlin and STEM monies).

USS completed the initial phase of tablet PC training and the faculty has evaluated the tablets.  The second group of tablets will be distributed to STEM faculty during the summer.

After an extensive delay due to reviews at the State level, the STEM Center Bids will be opened June 6, 2008.  Planning for the logistics of moving of affected classes, camps, offices to temporary quarters has begun. Demolition will occur Summer 2008 with construction to follow through Fall 2008.

The STEM Center and four electronic classrooms in the Henry Barnard School are expected to be completed by the end of the Fall semester 2008.  Future enhancements are planned to design, renovate, and furnish additional electronic instructional venues in Fogarty Life Science Classrooms 108 and 209, Gaige Classrooms 253 and 257, Horace Mann Classrooms 185, 186, 189, and 190 as well as in lecture halls at Clarke Science 128 and Fogarty Life Science 050. 

Inherited STEM Project delays could lead to undetermined re-sequencing of the phases of the initiative.

6/2/08

Back to objectives

Objective 1.8

By Fall 2008, provide all students with an academic advisor who is knowledgeable about curriculum and academic policy.

Primary Responsibility: Vice President for Academic Affairs

Progress to Date:

The Special Committee on Academic Advising, which was convened in the spring of 2007, prepared proposals for universal (mandatory) advising. The Committee's recommendations called for all students to consult with an advisor on their plans of study prior to registration. The Council of Rhode Island College passed a resolution calling for the implementation of universal advising by the fall semester of 2008. During the fall 2007 semester, a pilot project to test the feasibility of this initiative was implemented with the participation of the English Department and the Bachelor of Social Work Program. Every degree student with these majors was assigned an academic advisor. A "block" was placed on the students' computer registration access until advisors had been consulted. Reports submitted by the two participating department chairs indicate that the program was a considerable success. The program will go to scale during the spring of 2008 for registrations in summer and fall 2008 courses. The process of ensuring that all undergraduate degree students have been assigned an advisor is being undertaken in January and February 2008.

1/24/08

Academic Affairs Update:

During the fall 2007 semester, the English Department and the Bachelor’s in Social Work Program piloted a mandatory/universal advising program for all undergraduate degree candidates who were registering for spring 2008 courses.  Internal evaluation tools, tailored by the departments, revealed very high levels of satisfaction among both faculty and students.  Upon a recommendation by the ad hoc Council Committee on Academic Advising and an affirming resolution of the Council, mandatory advising was implemented College-wide during the spring 2008 semester for all degree students registering for summer and fall 2008 classes.  Close to one-hundred percent of enrolled students received academic advisement, prior to enrolling in classes, from their primary (designated) academic advisor, a team of advisors who offered group advising on designated days in certain departments, department chairs, or OASIS advisors.  The success of the program ensures that mandatory advising will remain in place, at least for another year, while satisfaction surveys/focus groups are conducted.  The first evaluation focus group is scheduled for May 15, 2008.  All faculty and staff are invited.  The ad hoc Committee will continue to meet during 2008-09 to monitor the ongoing implementation of the program.  Before the beginning of the fall 2008 semester, academic advising will be a key topic for new faculty orientation workshops.

Administration and Finance Update:

To support mandatory advising, Management Information Services worked with Academic Affairs to institute registration blocks on students without advisement. The successful pilot led to universal advising supported college-wide by PeopleSoft and MIS.

6/2/08

Back to objectives

Objective 1.9

Explore the feasibility of creating a Center for Teaching and Learning for College faculty and submit a feasibility plan by 2009.

Primary Responsibility: Vice President for Academic Affairs

Progress to Date:

Administration and Finance Update:

Information Services reports no progress on this objective, but stands ready to participate perhaps on a committee to address this initiative to facilitate substantial completion by the target date.

6/2/08

Back to objectives

Objective 1.10

For each year of this plan, continue to strengthen and expand activities to enhance faculty diversity throughout the College.

Primary Responsibility: Vice President for Academic Affairs

Progress to Date:

Human Resources meets with every search committee and goes over the affirmative action requirements, including their individual department goals. Feinstein School Education Human Development sends letters to potential candidates from the Annual Women and Minority Doctoral Directory.

The State Equal Opportunity Office sends all state departments percentage goals to be used in hiring racial/ethnic minorities and females.

Goals:
Minority - 14.5%
Female - 48.4%

Hiring Data: July 1, 2006 - June 30, 2007
Faculty hires - 79% female; 20.5% minority

1/24/08

Academic Affairs Update:

For each year of the plan, continue to strengthen and expand activities to enhance faculty diversity throughout the college (2008-210).

Human Resources met with every search committee during 2007-2008 and reviewed Affirmative Action requirements, including individual department goals.  The School of Education sends letters to potential candidates from the Annual Women and Minority Doctoral Directory, and the School of Management advertises positions on minority nurses at the nurse.com Website.  The hires for 2008-2009 are not yet complete.  In August 2008, the College will calculate gains in full-time gender and racial minority hires for the fall.

Administration and Finance Update:

Affirmative Action Office continued to work with search committees to diversify faculty and staff through strong recruitment and monitoring of the hiring process.  Although not all hiring has been completed, racial/ethnic and/or female faculty has been hired in the majority of hiring departments.

With representatives from all divisions, the President’s Dialogue on Diversity Committee presented campus-wide programs.

6/2/08

Back to objectives

Page last updated: July 25, 2008