Paul V. Sherlock Center on Disabilities, 600 Mount Pleasant Avenue, Rhode Island College, Providence, RI 02908, 401-456-8072
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Self-Directed Supports for Individuals with Developmental Disabilities
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INTRODUCTION TO SELF-DIRECTED SUPPORTS

Are you eligible for supports through Rhode Island's Division of Developmental Disabilities?
Do you know about Self-Directed Supports?


Self-Directed Supports (SDS) give you a way to have more choice and control over the services and supports you need to live a full life at home and in the community. With Self-Directed Supports, you, along with your family or people you know and trust, decide how to spend your Medicaid Long-term care dollars in ways that work best for you.

Compared to traditional agency-based services, the self-directed model allows for more flexibility, individualization and direct control, and allows more money to go towards direct support. However, it also involves more responsibility for the individual and/or their family or circle of support.

With Traditional Agency-Based Supports: With Self-Directed Supports: Click here to access the Sherlock Center's latest publication, "What You need to Know about Self-Directed Supports."

"I pick who I want to work with me and I am not afraid to say anything. I trust people I work with. I can go more places and where I want to. I take the bus when I don't need staff. I feel free." Kelly, User of SDS.

QUESTIONS?

Contact:
Claire Rosenbaum, Adult Supports Coordinator
Paul V. Sherlock Center on Disabilties

Phone: 401-456-4732
Email: crosenbaum@ric.edu

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