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Penni Sadlon

Penni Sadlon,
PhD, RN, CHSE
Assistant Professor
​Simulation Director
401-456-2759

LOCATION

RIC Lab Spaces:
FLS Annex SON

RINEC:
​350 Eddy Street
Providence, RI
​Room 283

​​RICSON Simulation Program

Simulation

Simulation use in nursing education relies on low to high fidelity modalities that frame specific objectives for simulation activities. Specific learning objectives are clearly written for each activity and follow evidenced-based practice (EBP) standards. Formative (assessing) and summative (grading) evaluation tools are used throughout all levels. Courses that use the lab frequently are: Fundamentals, Health Assessment, Adult Health, Pediatrics, Maternal-Child Health and Psychiatric-Mental Health. Programs outcomes are aligned with 1) the mission and vision of the SCNRL and RICSON, 2) the recommended standards of best practice by The International Association for Clinical Simulation in Nursing (INACSL), and 3) the accreditation standards by the Society for Simulation in Healthcare (SSH).


RIC Nursing Simulation Lab Receives National Accreditation

Click here to read more.


RI College School of Nursing Students learn to think critically by caring for complex simulated patients in a safe setting. Students are expected to complete preparation work prior to coming to the simulation. They are expected to act professionally, and adhere to safety principles at all times. Safety for patients and providers is the focus of our simulation center.​


Mission

To prepare students for professional, safe, and equitable nursing practice through innovative, experiential learning in a simulation environment.

Vision

To be a regionally recognized leader of simulation-based learning, research, information and technology use for improving healthcare and outcomes.


Simulation Modalities

*Simulation-based education (SBE) is accomplished using a variety of techniques. These techniques are called simulation modalities. For example, simulation may utilize static task trainers, computerized manikins, high-fidelity equipment that mimics real-world practice settings, and human-to-learner interaction using simulated patient actors. Each simulation site (RICSON and RINEC) has the capacity and capability to use a variety of these techniques and methods providing state-of-the-art targeted SBE appropriate for novice to expert student learners.

*Find out more by visiting the About the Simulation Program webpage.

Center Utilization

The Simulation Center and Nursing Resource Laboratory (SCNRL) is part of the School of Nursing (SON) at Rhode Island College. The space is fully utilized throughout the academic year. Newly equipped spaces provide state-of-the art areas that mimic a variety of clinical settings. For the academic year 2018-2019 center utilization has expanded to 2 site (RIC Campus and RINEC Location). Many simulations are now run simultaneously using the space and resource staff more efficiently. Simulation Center and Nursing Resource Laboratory (SCNRL) is part of the School of Nursing (SON) at Rhode Island College. The space is fully utilized throughout the academic year. Newly equipped spaces provide state-of-the art areas that mimic a variety of clinical settings. For the academic year 2018-2019 center utilization has expanded to 2 site (RIC Campus and RINEC Location). Many simulations are now run simultaneously using the space and resource staff more efficiently.

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Collaboration and Program Expansion

The Rhode Island Nursing Education Center, or RINEC is a new expansion project scheduled to open fall 2017.  This 133,000-square foot space in downtown Providence, RI is housed in an historic waterfront building, has undergone renovation specifically to accommodate shared spaces for Rhode Island College and the University of Rhode Island nursing programs, and the administrative offices of Brown University.  The downtown location is within the hub of the Brown medical school and area hospitals.  Several skills labs with high-technology manikins, high-fidelity rooms, standardized patient rooms, a home-care suite, and scaled-up classrooms are some features. This expansion is another positive step for integrating simulation education and ensuring its impact in the education of health professionals. The facility will support research collaboration within the community of scholars, and external professional development and simulation activities for a variety of health professions. The SCNRL program will continue to develop simulation curriculum at both the main RIC and downtown RINEC campuses.

Conclusion

The SCNRL accredited simulation program has a positive impact on students and faculty.  The SON expanded its enrollment in undergraduate and graduate levels, and the SCNRL developed faculty champions in simulation methodology, and collaborated with other scholars in nursing, social work, and medicine using interprofessional activities. The future of simulation at RICSON is promising.  Our home-grown solutions, innovations, and strong simulation presence regionally and nationally predicts a bright future for experiential education of the region's healthcare professional students and ultimately for the betterment of the care we provide to all our patients, families, and communities. ​​​​​​​​​​​

Page last updated: August 21, 2020