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Events Archive

2017 African American History Month

The 2017 National Black History Theme, designated by the Association for the Study of African American Life and History, is “The Crisis in Black Education.”

“In a global economy where the most valuable skill you can sell is your knowledge, a good education is no longer just a pathway to opportunity--it is a prerequisite. And yet, we have one of the highest high school dropout rates of any industrialized nation.”

–Barack Obama


ONGOING

Margaret Taylor Burroughs (1915-2010), cofounder of the DuSable Museum of African American History in Chicago, received an Honorary Doctorate of Public Service from Rhode Island College in 1990. Visit the collection of linocut prints by Burroughs in the Adams Library or view the collection online at ric.libguides.com/Margaret_Burroughs.

Wednesday, Feb. 1

2 – 4 p.m., DDC President's Dining Room
Embracing Diversity in 2017: What does it mean and what skills will it require?

In this discussion Deoshore Haig, LCSW (’95) defines micro-aggressions and facilitates a dialogue about the impact of micro-aggressions on inter-group social dynamics. Haig has worked with culturally diverse communities in social services for over 25 years and is trainer for “Considering the Value and Role of Culture and Diversity” in the Adoption and Foster Care Certificate program.
Sponsored by Gender and Women’s Studies Program

Monday and Tuesday, Feb. 6 & 7

11 a.m. – 6 p.m., Student Union Ballroom
Blood Drive & Marrow Registration

Roll up your sleeve and save a life! This blood drive commemorates Dr. Charles Drew, the African American inventor of the modern blood-banking process. Dr. Drew attended Amherst College in Massachusetts, received his first doctorate in medicine in 1933, taught surgery at Howard University Medical School and became the first African American to receive a Doctor of Medical Science degree from Columbia University.
Sponsored by the RIC Office of Health Promotion and the Unity Center

Wednesday, Feb. 8

Noon – 2 p.m., Horace Mann 193
Film: "13th"

This 2016 American documentary by director Ava DuVernay explores the history of race and the criminal justice system in the United States. The film’s title refers to the 13th Amendment. With commentary from Michelle Alexander and others, the film argues that mass incarceration is historically rooted to slavery.
Sponsored by the Unity Center

Saturday, Feb. 11 - cancelled and rescheduled for April 1

Symposium: “Next Steps in Exploring African American History”

This symposium continues the exploration of best practices in approaches to Black History in Rhode Island. The examination of the pedagogical approach to teaching Black History is continued from last year, when members of the 1696 commission explained their work. This event includes presentations on Rhode Island Black history, current classroom curricula, dramatic reading and the historical relationship between indigenous Rhode Islanders and those of African descent. Presenters include Ray Rickman from Stages of Freedom; Robb Dimmick from Educational Theater Collaborative; Joe Wilson Jr. from Trinity Repertory Company; the Rhode Island Historical Society; Richard Martin and Scott Bernstein from Cranston East, and Lorén Spears from Tomaquag an Indigenous Museum. Register online at: https://commerce.cashnet.com/RICNSPROD.
Sponsored by Feinstein School of Education and Human Development and Delta Kappa Gamma Society

Monday, Feb. 13

12:30 – 1:50 p.m., Craig-Lee 203
Open Class: Contemporary Black Theatre

This class studies African American theatre in America and English-speaking Africa since the 1960s, with an emphasis on representative plays, playwrights, movements and artists. The class is taught by RIC adjunct faculty instructor and Mixed Magic Theater founder Ricardo Pitts-Wiley.

Monday, Feb. 13 – Tuesday, Feb. 28

Unity Center
Art Exhibit: Larry Sykes

Larry Sykes retired as a professor of art from Rhode Island College in 1995. There he developed the curriculum for the school’s photography concentration. After receiving his undergraduate degree from Morgan State University, Larry earned his master’s degree at the Pratt Institute in New York. During the 1960s, he served as Director of the Carl J. Murphy Fine Arts Center at Morgan and later taught at New York University, the College of Art in Kumasi, Ghana, and the Parsons School of Design West Africa Program. Sykes also served as commissioner for the Rhode Island State Council on the Arts. His photography and illustrations have appeared in dozens of books and academic journals. Additionally, Sykes’ portraits have been collected and exhibited internationally. View his work in the Unity Center throughout the remainder of the month.
Sponsored by the Bannister Gallery and Gallery Z

Tuesday, Feb. 14

Noon – 1:50 p.m., Craig-Lee 231
Open Class: Critical Issues in Africana Studies

In this variable topics course students take a critical and empowering look at various cultural topics (e.g. music, sport and film) regarding people of African descent. The class is offered through the Africana Studies program and taught by RIC Assistant Professor of Sociology Sadhana Bery.

Thursday, Feb. 16

12:30 – 1:50 p.m., Craig-Lee 203
Open Class: Contemporary Black Theatre

This class studies African American theatre in America and English-speaking Africa since the 1960s, with an emphasis on representative plays, playwrights, movements and artists. The class is taught by RIC adjunct faculty instructor and Mixed Magic Theater founder Ricardo Pitts-Wiley.

Tuesday, Feb. 21

7 – 8:30 p.m., Student Union Café
Black History and Trivia Game

Contestants must be Rhode Island College students and are randomly selected from the audience. Contact the Unity Center for additional information at (401) 456-8791. Contestants receive a Black History Matters Hoodie sweatshirt to wear on Hoodie Day. Cash prizes include: first $100, second $50, third $25. Hint: Familiarity with African American History Month programming could mean a better chance of winning!
Sponsored by the Unity Center

Wednesday, Feb. 22

12:30 - 2 p.m., ALEX AND ANI Hall 138
Film: “Dr. Charles Drew Determined to Succeed”

This short documentary focuses on Charles Drew, an African American medical doctor remembered as the inventor of the blood bank. He also established, and was the first director of, the blood bank of the American Red Cross. Despite rampant racial discrimination, Drew achieved an extremely high level of education and became a well-respected scientist, surgeon, inventor and professor. His discoveries and work in organizing and administering blood banks in Europe and the Pacific during World War II saved countless lives. The film is followed by a brief discussion facilitated by Unity Center staff
Sponsored by Office of Health Promotion

Thursday, Feb. 23

6 – 8 p.m., Craig-Lee 103
Open Class: Race and Justice

This class focuses on the intersection of race with crime, justice and the law and considers institutionalized bias towards specific racial groups in the legal and criminal justice systems. The class is offered through the Sociology Department and taught by RIC Assistant Professor of Sociology Sadhana Bery.

7 – 8:30 p.m., Student Union Ballroom
Reflections: “Growing up a Black Man in America”

This live performance dramatizes the Black male experience in America and its many highs and lows. The all-male cast explores cultural profiling, historical misunderstandings, and surviving an often hostile environment with dignity and humor. Performed by members of Mixed Magic Theatre, with a talk-back immediately following.
Sponsored by Student Activities and the Unity Center

Monday, Feb. 27

Hoodie Day (observed)

Wear your hoodie up all day long in memory of Trayvon Martin and the scores of other victims of racial profiling across the country. According to a July 2013 report on theguardian.com, the night Trayvon was shot to death by George Zimmerman, the hoodie he wore had a badge with a picture of his dead cousin pinned to it. He carried a bag of Skittles and Arizona watermelon fruit juice cocktail, which he had just purchased. Black lives matter; come to the Unity Center for Skittles and Arizona between 11 a.m. and 3 p.m. (Supplies limited.).  Sponsored by The Unity Center

6 – 8:30 p.m., Roberts Hall Auditorium
Featured Film: "Moonlight"

In recognition of Black History Month, the Unity Center and the Africana Studies Program present the Academy Award winning film Moonlight. This timeless story of human self-discovery and connection is based on a true story and chronicles the life of a young black man from childhood to adulthood as he struggles to find his place in the world. The film has received 8 Oscar nominations and has won a Golden Globe for Best Picture and a SAG award for Best Supporting Actor. Doors open at 5:30 p.m. for a 6 p.m. screening; immediately followed by facilitated discussion. 
Sponsored by Academic Affairs

Events are free and open to the public unless otherwise noted. For updated information on events, stop by the Unity Center (DDC lower level).

Reasonable accommodation for disabilities may be provided upon request by contacting the Disability Services Center at 401-456-2776.​

2016 African American History Month

 

Association for the Study of African American Life and History (ASALH)
Adobe PDFOutside LinkHallowed Grounds: Sites of African American Memories

We have come over a way that with tears has been watered; we come treading our path through the blood of the slaughtered. – "Lift Every Voice and Sing," stanza 2


ONGOING

Margaret Taylor Burroughs (1915-2010), cofounder of the DuSable Museum of African American History in Chicago, received an Honorary Doctorate of Public Service from Rhode Island College in 1990. Visit the collection of linocut prints by Burroughs in the Adams Library or view the collection online at Outside Linkric.libguides.com/Margaret_Burroughs.

Tuesday, Feb. 2

8 – 10 p.m., Student Union, Room 422

Movie: "12 Years a Slave"

In the antebellum United States, Outside LinkSolomon Northup, a free black man from upstate New York, is abducted and sold into slavery. This film stars Chiwetel Ejiofor and Academy Award-winner Lupita Nyong’o.
Sponsored by the RIC student organization Women of Color

Thursday, Feb. 4

5:30 – 7:30 p.m., The Unity Center, Donovan Dining Center lower level
Movie: "Lila & Eve"

Lila, a grief-stricken mother reeling from her son’s murder, is urged to take matters into her own hands, sparking a journey of revenge and recovery. This film stars Jennifer Lopez and RIC alumna Viola Davis.
Sponsored by The Unity Center

Monday, Feb. 8

6 - 7 p.m., The Unity Center, Donovan Dining Center lower level
Movie: "Prince Among Slaves"

This documentary explores the dramatic true story of an African prince, Abdul Rahman Ibrahima Sori, who was captured in a war in West Africa and enslaved in Mississippi for 40 years. He was heir to Futa Jallon, a West African Empire the size of Great Britain. Twenty years into his enslavement he was reunited with a marooned sailor that his father had rescued decades earlier. This event brought public attention to his plight and set him on a course for freedom.
Sponsored by The Unity Center

Monday and Tuesday, Feb. 8-9

11 a.m. – 6 p.m., Student Union Ballroom
Blood Drive & Marrow Registration
Second Day

Roll up your sleeve and save a life! This blood drive commemorates Dr. Charles Drew, the African American inventor of the modern blood-banking process. Dr. Drew attended Amherst College in Massachusetts, received his first doctorate in medicine in 1933, taught surgery at Howard University Medical School and became the first African American to receive a Doctor of Medical Science degree from Columbia University.
Sponsored by the RIC Office of Health Promotion and the Unity Center, in conjunction with the Rhode Island Blood Center

Wednesday, Feb. 10

12:30 p.m. – 2 p.m.,The Unity Center, Donovan Dining Center lower level
FAFSA February Community Lunch

Join Learning for Life for fellowship, food and FAFSA advice. Financial aid professionals will be available to answer questions and help complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid. Don’t forget to bring your relevant documents (1040s, W2s).
Sponsored by Learning for Life

Thursday, Feb. 11

4 - 6 p.m., Student Union Ballroom
Panel Discussion: Race Matters

A panel of RIC faculty, staff and students explores the effects of race relations on campus life and society at-large. This discussion is moderated by RIC InterVarsity Christian Fellowship.Questions and answers by panelists and audience members follow the discussion.
Sponsored by InterVarsity Christian Fellowship

Tuesday, Feb. 16

3 - 4:40 p.m., Adams Library, Reinhardt Room (301)
Lecture: Eddie Soares Tribute—Rhode Island Ambassador of Jazz

Renowned jazz pianist Edwin Jose “Eddie” Soares (1913-1993) was the son of immigrants and a lifelong resident of Providence’s Fox Point. In this presentation, independent scholar and actress Sylvia Ann Soares introduces the music of Eddie Soares, shows archival images of his family, describes community activity in the first Cape Verdean Protestant Church in America and documents a musical career that included the Brown University Jazz Series, Providence’s Celebrity Club and the Jewels of Dixie.
Sponsored by the James P. Adams Library with support from the RIC Committee on College Lectures
This project is made possible through major funding support from the Rhode Island Council for the Humanities, an independent state affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

8 - 10 p.m., Student Union 422
Movie: "The Help"

Three very different women in Mississippi during the Civil Rights movement build an unlikely alliance around a secret writing project about maids and the families for whom they work. This film stars RIC alumna Viola Davis and Academy Award-winner Octavia Spencer.
Sponsored by Women of Color

Wednesday, Feb. 17

7 – 9 p.m., Student Union 307
Workshop: Cape Verdean Creole

This event is an opportunity to learn more about Cabo Verde’s culture and language. Learn how creole originated and key words, phrases and greetings. Want to know how much you learned? Take the quiz – no pressure.
Sponsored by Cape Verdean Student Association

Thursday, Feb. 18

6 – 9 p.m., Faculty Center
Community Forum: Haiti, the Dominican Republic and the Diaspora in Rhode Island

The evening begins with a reception, featuring entertainment by Haitian singer Fritza Remy and Dominican poet Elvys Ruiz. Syracuse University Professor of English Silvio Torres-Saillant delivers a keynote titled “The Pain of History in Quisqueya Today,” followed by a community forum moderated by Rhode Island Superior Court Associate Justice Walter Stone. A buffet dinner is included. For ticket information, contact wacriinfo@gmail.com.
Sponsored by the World Affairs Council of Rhode Island, in collaboration with the Unity Center

Monday, Feb. 22

6 – 7 p.m., RIC Interfaith Center, Donovan Dining Center lower level
Discussion Group: Black Presence in the Bible

Inspired by the writings of Rev. Walter McCray, this discussion group explores the biblical history of Black peoples as revealed through the scriptures (Book: “Oneness Embraced: Through the Eyes of Tony Evans” by Tony Evans). All are welcome to attend. Light refreshment is provided.
Sponsored by RIC InterVarsity Christian Fellowship and the Interfaith Center

Wednesday, Feb. 24

7-9 p.m., Student Union Cafe
Black History and Trivia Game

Contestants are randomly selected from the audience and must be RIC students. Contact the Unity Center for additional information at 401-456-8791. Contestants receive a chance to win a Hoodie Day sweatshirt. Gift card prizes: first $100, second $50 and third $25. Hint: Familiarity with African American History Month programming could mean a better chance of winning!
Sponsored by Student Activities, the Unity Center and the RIC student organization Harambee

Thursday, Feb. 25

6 – 8:30 p.m., Alex and Ani Hall, Room 138
Panel Discussion: Doctrine of Discovery

This presentation by Kenneth F. Adams, chief of the Upper Mattaponi Indian Tribe in Virginia, and Lawrence E. Wilson, executive director of RIC’s Office of Economic and Leadership Development, examines the little-known Doctrine of Discovery. This doctrine’s sweeping provisions affording European explorers the right to claim Native American lands, enslave Africans and Indians at will and strip these people of their heritage, culture, tribal governance, families and property. A video presentation is followed by a panel discussion about the origins of the doctrine, its impact in the Colonial period and its relevance today.
Sponsored by the Office of Economic and Leadership Development

Friday, Feb. 26

9:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m., Student Union Ballroom
Lecture and Exhibit: "Roll Out the Black"

RIC alumna Onna Moniz-John ’78 is a lecturer and collector of Black memorabilia. In this lecture, she displays and discusses pieces from her extensive travelling exhibit containing hundreds of Black memorabilia, from slavery to hip-hop, collected over more than 30 years. Moniz-John’s mission is to raise social consciousness by sharing with all races artifacts that celebrate the contributions, achievements and experiences of African Americans.
Sponsored by The Unity Center and Learning for Life, in conjunction with the CF/RIC Innovation Lab and Mt. Pleasant High School

Hoodie Day

Wear your hoodie up all day long in memory of Trayvon Martin and the scores of other victims of racial profiling across the country. According to a July 2013 report on theguardian.com, the night Trayvon was shot to death by George Zimmerman, the hoodie he wore had a badge with a picture of his dead cousin pinned to it. He carried a bag of Skittles and Arizona watermelon fruit juice cocktail, which he had just purchased. Black lives matter; come to The Unity Center for Skittles and Arizona between 11 a.m. and 3 p.m. (Supplies limited.)
Sponsored by The Unity Center

Saturday, Feb. 27

8 a.m. – 1:30 p.m., Alger Hall, Room 110
Educator Workshops: First Steps: An Exploration of African-American History in Rhode Island

This event provides educators with strategies to teach American history inclusively. Three interactive workshops are offered, followed by a keynote address delivered by Ken Wagner, Rhode Island commissioner of elementary and secondary education. In June 2014 The Rhode Island General Assembly established the Outside Link1696 Historical Commission to develop an African American history curriculum encompassing the historical period from 1696 to 2015 for use in all Rhode Island public schools. The commission’s name pays homage to the first documented group of enslaved Africans who landed aboard the brig Seaflower in Newport in 1696. The work of the commission is continuing under the guidance of a task force headed by the Rhode Island Historical Society. For more information about this symposium, email c_beatrice@verizon.net.
Sponsored by the Rhode Island Delta Kappa Gamma Society for Key Women Educators, Epsilon Chapter, and the Feinstein School of Education and Human Development

In the community
Saturday, Feb. 27

Noon., Pot Au Feu restaurant, 44 Custom House Street, Providence
Opening the Oyster

This extraordinary Black culinary event features a full-course dinner of dishes invented by Rhode Island master chefs, a lecture on the history of Rhode Island Black cuisine, an appearance by Pastry Queen of Rhode Island Duchess Quamino and a live performance by Rose Weaver. A portion of the proceeds benefit the Stages of Freedom Swim Empowerment Program. Seating is limited.
Tickets: $100 – Outside Linkbuy now or contact stagesoffreedom@aol.com for more black cultural events for everyone!

Events are free and open to the public unless otherwise noted. For updated information on events, stop by the Unity Center (DDC lower level).

Reasonable accommodation for disabilities may be provided upon request by contacting the Disability Services Center at 401-456-2776.

2015 African American History Month

Association for the Study of African American Life and History (ASALH)
1915 – 2015 A Century of Black Life, History and Culture
-

“Where justice is denied, where poverty is enforced, where ignorance prevails, and where any one class is made to feel that society is an organized conspiracy to oppress, rob and degrade them, neither persons nor property will be safe.” Frederick Douglass


ONGOING

Margaret Taylor Burroughs (1917–2010) was co-founder of the DuSable Museum of African American History in Chicago, received an Honorary Doctorate of Public Service from Rhode Island College in 1990. Visit the collection of linocut prints by the artist and educator permanently installed on the fourth floor of the Adams Library. See this beautiful collection and view the libguide at Outside Linkhttp://ric.libguides.com/Margaret_Burroughs.

Sunday, February 1

1 – 3:30 p.m., RISD Metcalf Auditorium/Chace Center
19th Annual Langston Hughes Community Poetry Reading

Langston Hughes’ powerful and poignant poems, dating from the Harlem Renaissance through the 1960s, are read aloud by members of the community accompanied by the Daniel Ian Smith Jazz Trio.

Sponsored by the Rhode Island School of Design. Free and open to the public. Reception following the event.

Tuesday, February 3

2 – 3:30 p.m., SU 307
Cultural competence for Black History Month Webinar

Presenter, Johnny Taylor Jr., President & CEO, Thurgood Marshall College Fund discusses best practices form DiversityInc.’s Top 50 companies on finding and developing Black talent, educating the workforce about Black history plus information on supplier diversity. Other topics include the meaning of racism and Black role models in corporate America.

Sponsored by The Unity Center and the Office of Student Life

Thursday, February 5

4 - 6 p.m., Student Union 307
Racial Understanding: An Open Forum

This facilitated discussion allows public commentary about the current climate of race relations on campus and in the wider community.  Moderated by the director of The Unity Center with discussion of the effects of racial profiling, mass incarceration and community organizing on life and death in America.

Sponsored by the RIC Unity Center and L.I.F.E.

Monday, February 9

11 a.m. – 6 p.m., Student Union Ballroom
Blood Drive & Marrow Registration

Roll up your sleeve and save a life! This blood drive commemorates Dr. Charles Drew, the African American inventor of the modern blood-banking process. Dr. Drew attended Amherst College in Massachusetts, received his first doctorate in medicine in 1933, taught surgery at Howard University Medical School and became the first African American to receive a Doctor of Medical Science degree from Columbia University.

Sponsored by the RIC Office of Health Promotion and the Unity Center in conjunction with the Rhode Island Blood Center.

Tuesday, February 10

11 a.m. – 6 p.m., Student Union Ballroom
Blood Drive & Marrow Registration
Second Day

The Rhode Island Blood Center is the only source of blood products for the state's hospitals and relies solely on volunteer donations. Roll up your sleeve and save a life!

Sponsored by the RIC Office of Health Promotion and Unity Center.

Wednesday, February 11

12:30 p.m. – 2 p.m., Gender and Women’s Studies Suite/Adams Library 1B
Free Movie - Hip Hop: Beyond Beats & Rhymes

Described by producer/director Byron Hurt as a "loving critique" of a number of disturbing trends in the world of rap music, this documentary provides a riveting examination of manhood, sexism, and homophobia in hip-hop culture. Critically acclaimed for its fearless engagement with issues of race, gender violence, and the corporate exploitation of youth culture, the film features interviews with Mos Def, Fat Joe, Russell Simmons and commentary from Beverly Guy-Sheftall and Michael Eric Dyson.

Sponsored by Gender and Women’s Studies.

Thursday, February 12

6:30 - 8 p.m., Student Union Cafe
Black History and Trivia Game

First prize $100, second prize $50, third prize $25.
Hint: Familiarity with African American History Month programming could mean a better chance of winning! Contestants must be Rhode Island College students and are randomly selected from the audience. Contact the Unity Center for additional information (456-8791). Contestants receive a chance to win a Hoodie Day sweatshirt.

Sponsored by Student Activities & The Unity Center

Friday, February 13

12:30 – 2 p.m., location TBA
Movie: Belle

Gugu Mbatha-Raw stars as the illegitimate, mixed-race daughter of a British admiral who plays an important role in the campaign to abolish slavery in England - based on the true story of Dido Elizabeth Belle. This 2014 film subtly explores the intersections of Belle’s lineage and social status while delivering the all the aesthetic pleasures of a period piece. 

Saturday, February 14

6:30 – 11:30 p.m., Omni Providence Hotel, One West Exchange Street, Providence
32nd Annual Rhode Island Black Heritage Society Ball

The theme for this year's black tie event is:  Education and Awareness.  The Black Heritage Society will recognize community groups that provide dynamic educational and after-school programs for urban youth.  Learn more about the Society's activities, events and plans for 2015, enjoy a wonderful dinner and finish the evening with dancing and entertainment provided by The Mac Odom Band.
Tickets: $100, on sale now

Sponsored by the Rhode Island Black Heritage Society. For more information, visit Outside Linkwww.ribhs.org

Monday, February 16

6 – 8p.m., Alger Hall room 110
Free Movie: Fruitvale Station

Fruitvale Station is a fictionalized recounting of the shooting of 22-year old Oscar Grant by a Bay Area Rapid Transit police officer on New Year's Day of 2009. The film follows Grant's life in the 24 hours leading up to the cold-blooded shooting. Returning home from a New Year's Eve celebration, Grant finds himself in the midst of an altercation, starring Michael B. Jordan and Octavia Spencer. Winner 2013- Audience Award and Grand Jury Award at the Sundance Film Festival, Best First Film from the New York Film Critics Circle, and Best New Filmmaker from the Boston Society of Film Critics.

Sponsored by the Unity Center and the NAACP-Rhode Island Chapter.

Thursday, February 19

6 – 7 p.m., Adams Library Fortes Room
Stories in Stone: America’s Colonial African Cemetery

This revealing presentation by local historian and preservationist, Keith Stokes, introduces the audience to the lives of Africans and later African Americans in Newport, RI through their final resting place. The Common Burying Ground on Farewell Street holds what has been recognized as perhaps the oldest collection of burial markers of both enslaved and freed Africans in America with births dating as far back as the late 1600s.

Sponsored by The Unity Center, and the African Alliance of RI

Saturday, February 21

6 – 9 p.m., Student Union Ballroom
Journey to the Motherland

The ninth annual celebration of African cultures includes dinner, music and entertainment. Doors open at 6 p.m. For more information email womenofcolor2013@gmail.com or contact the Unity Center at 456-8791.

Tickets on sale through Feb. 20th ; $5 in advance for RIC students with ID, $7 general admission, $10 at the door

Sponsored by RIC Women of Color.

Thursday, February 26

Hoodie Day

Wear your hoodie all day long in memory of Trayvon Martin. Skittles and Arizona watermelon juice drink (limited supply) available at the Unity Center

Sponsored by the RIC Student Union

Monday, October 6 – Friday, October 10

In the Community

Monday, October 6, Diversity & Inclusion Awards Luncheon, One Orms Street, Providence, RI, 12 - 1:30 p.m The 3rd annual awards luncheon recognizing Congressman James Langevin ‘90 and Adeola Oredola of Youth in Action for their work promoting equity and inclusion, featuring keynote speaker, Nadine Vogel, international expert on mainstreaming disability in the workforce, workplace and marketplace.
Sponsored by Diversity and Inclusion Professionals for registration information call 401-742-7891

All Week Long

Equality Shirts T-shirt salePurchase your $5 t-shirt all week long at the Unity Center. Various sizes with the signature Human Rights Campaign equal sign in gold on blue, or in pink on red for marriage equality.
Walt Whitman ExhibitUsing materials from Adams Library collections this lobby exhibit will focus on Whitman’s life, and will also feature several of the different editions of Leaves of Grass, on display all month. Outside Linkhttp://ric.libguides.com/whitman

Monday, October 6

10 a.m. – 4 p.m.
The Hope Bus
On the Quad

October is Breast Cancer Awareness month. The Hope Bus is an outreach program serving all of RI, with a focus on low income, uninsured and underinsured populations. In 2010 breast cancer became the no. 1 cause of cancer death in Hispanic women. The incidence of breast cancer is rising as more immigrants become acculturated to U.S. lifestyle. October is breast cancer awareness month. Learn about accessing affordable screenings, support & counseling. Sponsored by the Gloria Gemma Breast Cancer Resource Foundation, the Women’s Center and The Unity Center

4 – 6 p.m.
What to Do When Stopped By the Police
Student Union 307

This program discusses common sense methods for police-citizen interactions which will allow students, faculty and staff to safely survive those encounters, promote better understanding of police procedures and methods, as well as attempt to strengthen relationships between police and community members. Some discussion will also be provided on issues related to recent events in New York City (Eric Garner death) and Ferguson, MO (Michael Brown shooting), as well as issues pertaining to the arming of sworn campus law enforcement officers.
Presenter: Charles P. Wilson, National Chairman National Association of Black Law Enforcement Officers

4 – 8 p.m.
Interfaith Hour of Inspiration
Alger Hall 110

RIC Interfaith Center in conjunction with New Dimension Church ignites the RIC community through artistic expression including live music, krumpography, networking and more.
Featuring music by “From Within”
Thr3e Live Crew krumpography
Presenter: Priscilla Dasilva “Designing our Future”

Tuesday, October 7

9:30 – 10:50 a.m.
Art 334 – OPEN CLASS
American Art & Architecture
Alex & Ani Hall Rm 138

Artist George Catlin painted what he thought was a dying race, the American Indian. From 1830 to 1836, Catlin produced more than 450 portraits and scenes for his traveling Indian Gallery at the same time Congress debated policy about Native Americans’ role in American society. We will view Catlin’s works and contextual imagery in order to consider his personal motives and contributions to art and history. How did Catlin portray individuals? What can we learn from depictions of rituals? What’s missing from these paintings?
Sara Picard, assistant professor, Art Department

10 a.m. – 12 p.m.
Making College Campuses LGBT Friendly
Alger 110

Presenter: Annie Russell, director URI LGBTQ Center
Sponsored by the Gender and Women’s Studies Program

5:15 - 6:30 p.m.
Using Transgender Friendly Picture Books to Promote Reading Growth
Horace Mann 183

Many people of all ages know very little about the transgender experience but now there are some very meaningful books that can help young children begin to know about people who are gender different including transgender and gender creative. This multimedia session will look at some young children who are transgender or gender creative and different books that are available to share and discuss with them.
Elizabeth Rowell, professor, Elementary Education

Wednesday, October 8

11 a.m. – 2 p.m.
Study Abroad Informational Fair
President’s Dining Room

This program will provide students with an opportunity to speak with representatives of the RIC affiliated off-campus study abroad programs so that they can become informed about the opportunities for them to experience living and learning in a variety of locations and situations. What better way to learn cultural, ethnic, and linguistic diversity?
Sponsored by the RI College Study Abroad Office
Web sites of RIC-affiliated study abroad programs:
AIFS Outside Linkhttp://aifsabroad.com/
API Outside Linkhttp://www.academicintl.com/
CIS Outside Linkhttp://www.studyabroad-cis.com/?page=programs
TEAN Outside Linkhttp://www.educationabroadnetwork.org/?id=9
Global Links Outside Linkhttp://www.globalinksabroad.org
SIT Outside Linkhttp://www.sit.edu/studyabroad/scholarships.htm
CAPA Outside Linkhttp://www.capa.org/

12:30 - 2 p.m.
Walt Whitman: Life and Work
Adams Library-Fortes Room

Walt Whitman was an American poet, essayist, and journalist. This program will focus on his life and work, and the sexuality represented in his poetry. He is now widely acknowledged as a gay poet, but his sexuality was never actually known. Whitman’s poetry explicitly depicts love and sexuality, and Leaves of Grass was often considered obscene and pornographic. Our programs about Walt Whitman are honoring him not only for Diversity Week, but also for LGBT History Month.
Visit the LibGuide at Outside Linkhttp://ric.libguides.com/whitman
Presented by associate professor Anita Duneer and assistant professor Alison Shonkwiler from the English Department
Sponsored by James P. Adams Library

12:30 – 2 p.m.
Crimes of Honour
Adams Library, Floor 1B

“CRIMES OF HONOUR” documents the terrible reality of femicide- the belief that a girl's body is the property of the family, and any suggestion of sexual impropriety must be cleansed with her blood. This film explains that honor killings have no basis in Islamic teachings yet are disturbingly on the rise, a tragic statement about the lack of basic human rights still endured by millions of women today.
Sponsored by Gender and Women’s Studies Film Series

12:30 – 2 p.m.
ACCESS Challenge: An Eye-Opening Experience
RIC “Quad”

Come and try an Eye-Opening Experience! The Fall 2014 Access Challenge will feature visual impairment (VI) simulation activities so students, faculty, and staff can “see’ what it is like to have low or no vision. Participants will have the opportunity to learn about service dogs, Braille, white cane awareness, how to be a sighted guide, careers in the field of VI, and more!
Sponsored by Advocacy and Beyond Club (ABC), the Paul V. Sherlock Center on Disabilities, The Disability Services Center.

12:30 – 2 p.m.
Diversity in the Workplace- Challenges, Implications, and Recommendations
Alger 110

This is a session of poster presentations. Students share their understanding of various work-related diversity topics with the RIC community. This session aims to enhance students’ awareness of various diversity issues in the workplace.
Presenters: School of Management students
Sponsored by assistant professors Jiyun Wu and Julie Urda, Management and Marketing department and Linda Kent-Davis, Director of Career Development Center


12:30 – 2 p.m.
Race Matters
Faculty South Dining Room

Join us to learn the facts about the Be The Match marrow donor registry! We will review the need, guidelines to join, the registration process and the collection procedures. Transplant recipient & college athlete, Jon DeCasanova, will share his transplant journey and inspiration for life after cancer. Lunch will be provided.
Presenters: Nicole Pineault, Recruitment Supervisor Marrow Donor Program, and Jon DeCasanova RI Blood Center a Be The Match Partner
Sponsored by: ALLIED for Nursing Karen Hetzel, Associate Professor School of Nursing

4 – 5:15 p.m.
General Education 264 – OPEN CLASS
Crossing the Gender Line
Horace Mann 183

Transgender author Claudine Griggs, discusses her book, “Crossing the Gender Line” in an open class format. Those interested are invited to attend.
Elizabeth Rowell, professor, Elementary Education

Thursday, October 9

12 – 2 p.m.
ReelNative
Faculty South Dinning

ReelNative is a PBS project encouraging Native American videographers to express their identities, lives, political perspectives and cultures. ReelNative videos will be shown followed by a group discussion about what these local stories share about contemporary life for Native Americans.
Presenter: Maria Lawrence, PhD
Associate professor, Elementary Education

4 – 7 p.m.
Sino-Africa Relations in Cape Verde
Alger 110

Mr. Ailton Barbosa ’10, RIC alumnus in Political Science, will share insights from his master’s program research at Fudan University, China on “Small Chinese Merchants in the Cape Verde and their Impact in the Local Community and Sino-Cape Verdean Relations”. Introduction will be provided by Dr. Peter Mendy, Professor of History and Africana Studies. Dr. Shani Carter will present a panel discussion of students who visited China during the last academic year.
Sponsor: Institute for Portuguese and Lusophone World Studies at RI College
Contact: Marie R. Fraley, Director


6 - 7 p.m.
General Education 268 – OPEN CLASS
Bullying Viewed from Multicultural Lifespan Perspectives
Horace Mann 183

Stump Olsen, Youth Services Manager/Training Coordinator Employment & Training Community Care Alliance and formerly OUTSpoken Director of Youth Pride, LGBTQ Bullying and its effects from a Personal and a Mentor's Perspective
Elizabeth Rowell, professor, Elementary Education

Friday, October 10

12 - 2 p.m.
Matinee Movie
El fantástico mundo de Juan Orol (The Fantastic World of Juan Orol)
The Unity Center

Hispanic Heritage Month featured film, Mexico’s half-forgotten B-movie master, Juan Orol, receives a pitch-perfect tribute in this irresistible love letter to a self-made man of showbiz, whose career spanned nearly 60 films. Through memories of his Galician childhood, forced exile to Cuba and arrival in Mexico, Juanito pursues failed careers before finding himself in the movies. Includes light lunch.
Directed by Sebastián del Amo, Mexico, 2012
Sponsored by The Unity Center


The Unity Center
20th Anniversary Celebration
Friday, October 17
Donovan Dining Center
5-9 p.m.

  • SILENT AUCTION – Featuring 2 tickets to the NE Patriots vs Denver Broncos November 2nd
    (
    4th Row, 50 Yard Line behind home team!)
  • ENTERTAINMENT – Trovadores, Spoken Word, Unity Players
  • BUFFET DINNER
  • RECOGNITION AWARDS
    Gary Penfield, Vice President for Student Affairs (1979 – 2014 ret.)
    Jay Grier Latimer, Director of the Unity Center 1994- 2001
  • DANCING

To purchase tickets online, Outside Linkclick here.
For more information contact The Unity Center @ 401-456-8791. We welcome your inquiries. ​​​

Page last updated: September 26, 2017